2019 Book Drive

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When you're low income, prioritizing spending is a must. And for many people living in Eastern Idaho, books don’t make the list of things families need to get by. Providing a wealth of books to children in low-income homes can help break the link between poverty and poor academic outcomes. Join us and make a difference today.

April 5th-12th: United Way Children’s Book Drive

Donate new and gently used books the week of April 5th through April 12th. Find a complete list of book drop off locations below (coming soon).

Drop Off Locations: COMING SOON

April 12th: United Way Children’s Book Fair at Barnes & Noble 

Noon to 8pm at Barnes & Noble, Grand Teton Mall

Come by for some family fun, story time, and participate in literacy building activities geared for kids of all ages! Portion of purchase will support United Way Children’s Book Drive

How can I help give books to low-income kids?

There are numerous ways you can support our book drive, such as;

Host a book drive at your place of business – a great team building tool!

Serve as an official United Way Children’s Book Drive drop off location – a great way to engage the community!

Run a Neighborhood Book Collection Drive – have your employee’s teammates, or group members distribute flyers and collect books from residents. A terrific way for the community to see your group in action!

Bring your team of volunteers to help us collect, sort, and clean books – we need lots and lots of volunteers!

Become a United Way Children’s Book Drive Sponsor

 

 

NOW THE FACTS: SUMMER LEARNING LOSS (AKA SUMMER SLIDE) STATISTICS

In Idaho, low-income homes average only 1 book for every 300 children.  By comparison, in middle and high-income homes, each child has an average of 50 books. (Book It Forward, 2014)

85% of children in the juvenile justice system are functionally illiterate.

Kids who only read in school will rarely be great readers. The availability of reading material in the home is directly associated with children’s achievement in reading. (Book It Forward, 2014)

Reading proficiently is the most significant indicator of academic success.

During summer, low-income students regress more than two months in reading achievement while their middle-class peers make slight gains (Cooper, 1996). 

Only 36% of Idaho fourth graders scored at or above proficient in reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress test in 2015 (National KIDS COUNT Program)

63% of low-income first graders were reading at grade level in the spring of 2013. When they returned as second graders in the fall, only 41% were reading at grade level. (Idaho State Depart. of Education)